Wednesday, June 03, 2009

Early Learning Experiences?

Darren recently sent me a delightful photo of his baby daughter Emma perusing some new work by paleo- artist Luis Rey, a fine scene of a Deinonychus killing a Tenontosaurus (brother Will works on Legos in the background).



Will she grow up to be a paleontologist or at least a naturalist? I find it quite possible, the more so since my mother sent me these three pics of me as a toddler, with no comment.



First, in front of the mostly adult library I had free run of (I read at three).



Second, with the largest revolver possible for a guy who could just about walk.


And, best: trying to ID a bug with the little Golden Guide to insects.

It appears I haven't changed all that much in 55+ years!

14 comments:

Matt Mullenix said...

I think we are who we are, and early!

Cat Urbigkit said...

Looks to me like Darren's house is the place to be!

PBurns said...

Excellent pics of little Steve! A kind in footsies with a revolver is another era isn't it?

Matt Mullenix said...

BTW Steve,

When was color invented? Was it a shock to wake up one morning and see things in multiple hues?

(By the time I came along, things were in color, but sort of washed out and blurry.)

Reid Farmer said...

I agree with Patrick, the Dr Dentons and the revolver are pretty cool. I bet you were watching Rin-tin-tin!

Also, I had that Golden bug book, too

Matt - from looking at our family albums, there really are hardly any color pictures before about 1960. That was also about when color TV came in. I vividly remember the first time I watched a color TV: my father and I watched the 1959 Army-Navy football game at a neighbor's house. It was amazing

Matt Mullenix said...

No Reid, I meant for you older fellows: What was it like growing up in black and white?

I mean, did your eyes have to adjust in the 1960s when they turned the color on?

Matt Mullenix said...

See, it was a joke. Because you're old.

Ok then, so when was humor invented?

Matt Mullenix said...

Man, tough crowd! But I'm here all week. Try the fish!

LabRat said...

Yeah, I think Matt's right- we call it temperament in dogs, but I do think personality is what it is and starts showing early.

I don't have pictures available, but I remember a beautifully illustrated dinosaur book much like the one pictured first, another one full of myths and legends (quite bloody, I don't know who thought it was for kids- the one of El Cid was... lavish), and pawing through my father's medical textbooks just to see the pictures.

Oh, and reading at an adult level at a very early age in an awesome way to alienate yourself because other eight year olds don't know what "ubiquitious" means, let alone use it in casual conversation.

Anonymous said...

I was born in 1982 so never saw in black and white, but I do remember my dad had an old set of encyclopedias which I would look through and read all the time. The "F" book really caught my attention and I would open the page to "falconry" and stare at the gyrfalcon on the fist and dream. . . Reidy

M.L. Miller said...

One Christmas when I was very young, I received a game called Jungle Hunter. It was a pistol that shot suction darts at a metal board with targets of lion, elephant, etc. Judging by photos from that Christmas, it was clearly my favorite gift of all time. I wonder if my parents would have bought it if they knew where it would lead...

M.L. Miller said...

Regarding the Golden Guides, I wonder if the current versions contain tips on catching wildlife, keeping wild pets and preserving specimens like they did when I was using them. Somehow I doubt it.

fieldguidetohummingbirds said...

Steve, my family's photo album contained pix almost identical to yours (toy guns included, though my footed jammies had a hood with ears and a marsupial pouch) plus many of me posing with assorted critters. Lots of familiar stories in the comments as well, especially LabRat's observation on early reading and Reidy's passion for certain volumes of the encyclopedia ("B" was my favorite).

Some passions do show themselves so early that they might as well be encoded in our DNA. I'm not sure you can make a naturalist out of a kid whose heart is destined to belong to space or music or history or math, but isn't it nice to know that at least a few lucky ones are being exposed to the kind of things that lit a fire in so many of us at a similar age?

Steve Bodio said...

Nice blogs you've got there!