Friday, December 07, 2012

Literary Cartridges

What famous short story do these two very distinctive cartridges represent?

11 comments:

neutrino-cannon said...

It would appear that those represent the emasculation of the 20th century American man.

"short, ugly, shockingly big-bored"

Steve Bodio said...

Excellent quote.

Ellie Di said...

I know nothing about bullets, and I fear I know even less about short stories. But I do know that the post and picture together made me think inexplicably of Hemingway and Fitzgerald.

Steve Bodio said...

Great metaphor Ellie, for both-- one I never thought of, and today a bit embarrassing for both, metaphorically comparing size as they did...

As NC knows (he was being subtle) there is also a very specific reference to a story in the "canon" (email or send yr address), perhaps with metaphorical undertones...

Anonymous said...

A short and happy one?

Jim Cornelius
www.frontierpartisans.com

Steve Bodio said...

"Offcouse" as Canat would say-- you got it Jim, as did NC.

Q Blog-- where literature meets ballistics...

Nathaniel Fitch said...

The fact that it's a .505 Gibbs and a 6.5x54 makes me guess it's Hemingway.

The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber?

(Posted this in the wrong spot before, feel free to delete the wrong one.)

Steve Bodio said...

No worry and right on both counts.

It pleases me that my readers know cartridges AND lit!

Nick Weeks said...

] Nathaniel got the cartridges right ...Macomber also used a 30-06 poorly on a lion in the beginning of the story before he met his maker via a Buff. The .505 belonged to the other central character Robert Wilson Great story

Anonymous said...

...well, Steve, make that SOME of yer readers know cartridges and lit.....So, for yer OTHER readers, when are you going to do a sighthound/doggy I.D. photo quiz?(hint hint)....L.B.

Pete said...

I had no idea what those cartridges were, but nontheless I would have guessed 'The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber.' For some crazy reason that story has stuck in my head since I read it in High School